LOGAN RIVER PAST

Once the lifeblood of the community, the Logan River has seen both people and goods transported along its reaches, bringing in supplies and sending out goods such as timber and sugar cane.

The river was a rich source of seafood and its banks covered with edible plants.

The Logan River has remained largely untamed, with natural banks continuing to support important habitat. Unfortunately, with no central plan for river use, it has slipped from view and is largely unappreciated.


Once the lifeblood of the community, the Logan River has seen both people and goods transported along its reaches, bringing in supplies and sending out goods such as timber and sugar cane.

The river was a rich source of seafood and its banks covered with edible plants.

The Logan River has remained largely untamed, with natural banks continuing to support important habitat. Unfortunately, with no central plan for river use, it has slipped from view and is largely unappreciated.


Celebrating our history

The community hold the treasures of the Logan River and sharing them will allow others to connect. Do you have a story that has been handed down through the generations or one of your own that you would like to share? Maybe the story is captured in an image.

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  • 'A Personal Story', written by Jenny (property owner along the river)

    over 2 years ago

    Due to having lived by the Logan River for most of my years, I must say it is a big part of my life.

    I remember as a small girl, watching my father swim in the river, and due to the current he would only let us paddle on the edge.

    The fish we use to catch on our bamboo rods and coke bottle lines - bream, catfish, flathead and eels, and sometimes whiting, not to mention the tortoises. We would see old Charlie Flesser rowing his boat close to the bank to catch the jumping mullet.

    In the drought... Continue reading

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  • Here is some information on Larry Storey Park at Waterford

    almost 3 years ago

    The park was named after Laurence (Larry) John Storey (30 June 1908 – 3 December 2000, buried at Logan Village Cemetery) ), a local dairy farmer who also worked on the construction of the Waterford Bridge. He was also a local councilor on the Waterford Shire Council. Other parks along the river were named around 1975, so it's quite possible that Larry Storey Park was also named around this time.

    The land appears to have been a government reserve for a long time. A map from 1893 shows the area that is now the park had already been gazetted (declared)... Continue reading

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  • 'A Personal Experience of the Logan River' written by Ruth, landholder along the Logan River

    almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for the opportunity to contribute my views and personal experiences of the Logan River and indeed thank you for setting up this River Vision project. I think the Logan River’s protection is essential and if the water quality is preserved, the community and environment benefit not only now but into the future. I would like that the waterways be respected as a life blood to the community. Because in failing to do so, literally from personal observations, we are flushing away the wildlife. What is not healthy for them, cannot be healthy for us.

    For over 40 years,... Continue reading

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  • Logan River Crocodile

    by Craig & Kate, almost 3 years ago
    Croc

    The river was home to an unusual visitor in the early 1900s. Following repeated reports of an 'alligator' in the river, one was shot in June 1905. The crocodile was first shot by Charlie Gottch in the river opposite his property which was located between Melliodora Road and the River Glen Village. The injured crocodile travelled upstream to Logan Village to the old ferry landing, where it was dragged from the river and skinned. The skin adorned the Logan Village school walls for many years. The prospect of further crocodiles did not deter the local children from swimming in the... Continue reading

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  • Captain Slack and the convicts.

    by Julie ann, almost 3 years ago

    I was told In 1976 ,by a very elderly timber cutter that worked on Tamborine mountain, that Slacks Creek, was named after a very nasty commander named Slack. He said that It was told that Captain Slack wanted to explore the creek and subsequently see if he could reach the river. He commanded a few convicts to assist him on his exploration.The convicts came back but Captain Slack was apparently taken by a crocodile.No one asked how he came to be in the river and not in the boat. From then on many of the convicts became free settlers and... Continue reading

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